oConomy
March 16, 2009 by Amit Bakshi

Last week we looked at PHP in our ongoing coverage of hot skills in demand on oDesk.  This week, we're highlighting Microsoft’s .NET software framework.

In spite of some strong growth by Apple’s Mac OS X operating system in the last few years, Microsoft Windows still rules the roost with nearly 90% market share.  This doesn’t seem likely to change in the near future.  The ability to write code for computers running Windows continues to be a valuable skill and the .NET software framework is a key component of many applications.

A major reason the .NET software framework is valuable is that it was designed with Windows in mind.  This means, among other things, that installing an application built on .NET is simplified, since issues such as potential conflicts with other software and security are largely handled for you.  .NET programs also run under the Common Language Runtime, which means you don’t need to jump through a lot of hoops to optimize your code for all sorts of different memory configurations.  Programmers also have access to a large library of .NET classes that manage common functions like manipulating files or handling graphics.  And, since .NET is the backbone of many popular programming languages, like C#, VB.NET, and Cobra, .NET coding skills can improve your ability to code in these languages.

Now, let’s take a look at .NET jobs on oDesk.

net-developers

As you’d expect from a bedrock skill like .NET, demand has remained steady, despite the difficult economy.  Over 225 .NET jobs are posted each month on oDesk, for the over 4,300 .NET Developers on oDesk to apply for.  In good times and bad, we all rely on our computers to get our work done.  So long as Windows maintains its dominance in the businessplace, .NET should continue to enjoy such strong, unwavering demand.

This tutorial is a good place to start if you’re interested in mastering the .NET framework.  Microsoft, of course, maintains a Developer Center for .NET users as well.  The BCL Team, in charge of maintaining the Basic Class Library that .NET programmers utilize for handling the little common tasks that pepper most projects, also have a blog.

Amit Bakshi

Vice President of Marketing at LawPivot

Amit Bakshi is the Vice President of Marketing at LawPivot. He formerly served as Product Marketing Manager for oDesk.

  • http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/MustafaQasim Mustafa

    It's a great news for me who've started grasping .net as Job skill :)

  • http://www.capitt.com John

    .NET all the way. I hope next Windows version is a success.