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my client is not responding

hi!

case1: i have a contract with a client, who is supposed to work with an agency. it was a huge task to complete within 72 hrs, but i assigned to him for that period. i completed the task (some extra time needed) then contact him, but he is not responding for a week, though i have sent him multiple messages. his payment system was verified and spent some in odesk. i tried to locate him in his agency, but i found no name there matching to him.

i haven't delivered the task to him so far due to non response.

what can i do now?

case2: another client contracts me several times. he want a sample of my article. i delivered one to him. after that he is also non responding. he also not confirmed me whether i was selected or declined.

what is the fate actually in such clients to bid.

Vote Result

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Score: 0.0, Votes: 0
I will guess that the first

I will guess that the first contract you are speaking of was the 10 articles to be delivered 'urgently.' Are you sure you were actually hired for the contract? The reason i'm doubtful is that the client still has six writers in the interview phase. If you haven't delivered the work and completed it after the deadline it's likely that the client is unhappy with the lack of delivery and really doesn't have much reason to pay or even interact with you. 72 hours is rather a long time to complete 10 articles if you have no other contracts and already have the knowledge required, although whether that is worthwhile for such low payment only you can say. It breaks down into three articles daily--and since the client did make time a prerequisite, it's realistic to assume that he really did need the work on that deadline. If I were a client with an urgent work request and the contractor failed to deliver on time, I don't think I'd really bother to respond to his messages. If I did, it'd just be a short note to say that the delivery failure had lost him the contract. I'd just move on to a contractor who could do the contract properly.

Your second case: Clients generally don't inform every rejected applicant. It would be realistic to assume that the client has simply hired someone else for the job. Some clients receive hundreds of applications and it's not practical to notify every rejected contractor.

Incidentally, offering samples before hire is not really the best idea. Rather attach a previously published piece or direct the client to your portfolio.

I see that your ten article

I see that your ten article client has no active contracts, which presumably means you were never hired or your contract has been ended. The client also has one feedback score of two stars--not something you really want to play with. Additionally, his 'lowest bid wins' remark is a red flag that things were never going to go well regardless.

Always get an up front payment for fixed rate contracts!

If you have not asked for and received an up front payment for whatever work you did you can't even leave feedback. As Kirsten asked, were you actually HIRED (is there an active contract listed in your "my jobs" section?)

If you were hired and the client is not responding you can contact customer support to ask them to contact your client on your behalf, but there is not guarantee. However, it does mean that the client gets flagged on the oDesk system and if they make a habit of not paying they're history.

The second case probably means that the client decided not to hire you. They may not have hired anyone, or they hired someone else. Make sure you regularly check copyscape to see if your "sample article" has been published or sold by the client. If you were not paid for it the article belongs to you and the client has no right to use it.

i was actually hired in the first case

thanks for your answer. actually my first case was "editor needed**medical topic**". it was the name when he posted the job. but before the final contract, he made some changes. then the title was "medical questions". contract id no. #12885326. when i click to this job it shows me "You have already been hired on this job". if any body track my discussions with him it will be clear.
one can search using "editor needed**medical topic**" and find that there is two same topic by the same client posted in the same date. one of them is my contract. it was posted as a $10 task(1 file). finally it became $90, because he wanted to take a nine file task.

shall i deliver the task and claim for money or take help from odesk support?

I see that that contract is

I see that that contract is still open. The question now is did you log the time with the team room as you were supposed to? If so, then the money is guaranteed unless the client can prove that you didn't do the work. If you logged the time, it should show up in your pending payments section and will become active 14 days after the work week ended. What I'm curious about is why you haven't delivered the work to that client? Of course he's going to have a problem with paying you if you don't give him the work.

Kirsten, it was a fixed price contract!

Kirsten Holmes wrote:
I see that that contract is still open. The question now is did you log the time with the team room as you were supposed to? If so, then the money is guaranteed unless the client can prove that you didn't do the work. If you logged the time, it should show up in your pending payments section and will become active 14 days after the work week ended.

I honestly don't know what you mean. Wasn't / Isn't this a fixed rate contract? (I checked. It WAS / IS a fixed rate contract) If so, What does the team room have to do with it, or am I missing something? Even if it HAD been an hourly contract the question is futile as there are no hours showing against any contract in the OP's profile so nothing has (clearly) been logged. Payment doesn't "become active" "14 days after the work week ended," but on the Wednesday after the week following the end of the work week. Which is irrelevant if it is (and this *is*) a fixed price contract.

There is altogether a bit too much "assumption" going on here. First you pick (seemingly at random) some job posting the OP wasn't even hired for, now this "Did you log the time like you were supposed to?" thing?

Unless I have found TOTALLY the wrong job posting I haven't the faintest clue where you get "log the time like you were supposed to" from... Why should he log time for a fixed rate contract?

Edited to add: The client "hired" 6 (!!!) contractors for this contract - 2 from one and 4 from the other (identical) job posting. He hasn't paid any of them yet by the looks of things (or they'd appear on his profile either as "Job in progress" or closed contracts) The OP is among the "set of 4" - Strangley the client shows as having only one active contract, and has posted 104 jobs with only 11 paid contracts.

I am well known for taking fixed price contracts without an up front payment (which is a BAD idea and you should NOT do this) but I'd not have lifted a finger on this without some payment up front... It will be interesting to see if ANYONE will get paid for this....

Kirsten wrote:
What I'm curious about is why you haven't delivered the work to that client? Of course he's going to have a problem with paying you if you don't give him the work.

I would hazard a guess he didn't deliver the work because the client was not responding to any messages? Would you throw 9 lots of medical writing at someone who can't even be bothered to respond to any communications?

Question, Petra.

Petra R. wrote:

Would you throw 9 lots of medical writing at someone who can't even be bothered to respond to any communications?

Have you read the OP's medical writting? There might be a reason the client isn't responding. Wink

Well, there is that to it, but that doesn't help the OP much...

Cate B. wrote:
Petra R. wrote:

Would you throw 9 lots of medical writing at someone who can't even be bothered to respond to any communications?

Have you read the OP's medical writting? There might be a reason the client isn't responding. ;)

Well, yes, that did occur to me... But then handing over the work wouldn't do any good either.

One would assume that the client interviewed the OP and had a look at his writing, so they should have been aware of the level of English they could expect. They haven't even see the work yet anyway....

To be honest the client's hiring pattern on this doesn't look very promising, they are almost certainly getting someone to do the work they were hired for themselves (from what I can gather from what the OP said) - Also, they have hired 6 people to do this stuff, and not paid a single Dollar to any of them so far... I think we are looking at typical bottom feeders leeching off of each other here...

Petra, you've not been

Petra, you've not been keeping up. We have since moved on from the fixed rate contract we originally thought it was. The OP has told us the contract he was actually talking about, which was an hourly contract. Hence my comments on time logging. Obviously there is absolutely no time logged, although a hire has happened. No Logged time+no work delivered: I don't think the question should be why hasn't the client paid. A more appropriate one would be, "Why would the client pay?"

"What I'm curious about is

I've been looking at the wrong contract. Now that I'm on the right page, it looks as though the client's average pay rate is about $1 an hour maximum and that he's the type who goes for the lowest possible rate, barring any other criteria.

The trouble is that the client's English skills are better than the OP's, so I doubt he'd be willing to pay anything for a task he could have done better himself.

I have kept up. You haven't.

Kirsten Holmes wrote:
Petra, you've not been keeping up. We have since moved on from the fixed rate contract we originally thought it was.

"We" didn't....." Until the OP actually told us nobody could have guessed which contract he was talking about. Especially not twice.

Quote:
The OP has told us the contract he was actually talking about, which was an hourly contract. Hence my comments on time logging. Obviously there is absolutely no time logged, although a hire has happened. No Logged time+no work delivered: I don't think the question should be why hasn't the client paid. A more appropriate one would be, "Why would the client pay?"

There is no hourly contract. The contract is fixed price. The OP indeed told us which contract it is. It is a fixed priced contract, 6 people were hired for it under 2 different job postings, and not one of them has been paid.

Where on earth were you looking? You DO know that contracts a contractor has been hired for no longer appear in their "recent applications" list? I see you have figured out what's what in the meantime. Good.

You DO know that contracts a

You DO know that contracts a contractor has been hired for no longer appear in their "recent applications" list?

Nope, I did not know that.